Sale: 532 / 19th Century Art, Dec. 10. 2022 in Munich Lot 345

 

345
Karl Hagemeister
Mädchen im Kohlfeld, 1886.
Oil on canvas
Estimate:
€ 20,000 / $ 18,400
Sold:
€ 46,875 / $ 43,125

(incl. surcharge)
Mädchen im Kohlfeld. 1886.
Oil on canvas.
Warmt G 197 (2015: G 167). Lower right signed and dated. Verso of the canvas with two faded illegible stamps. Verso of the stretcher with an old label inscribed: "Eigenthum von / Friedrich Hagemeister / Prof. Hagemeister", sowie mit weiterem Etikett "Nr. 693 / Schulamt / Brandenburg G.H. / Ölgemälde / Prof. K. Hagemeister / 'Mädchen im Kohlfeld' Brandenburg 15 / IV [19]43". Numbered "B-0149" and "69.3". 119 x 73 cm (46.8 x 28.7 in).

Accompanied by a written expertise from Dr. Hendrikje Warmt, Karl Hagemeister Archive & catalogue raisonné, Berlin, October 24, 2022.

PROVENANCE: From the artist's estate.
Ms M. Schweitzer, Brandenburg/Havel (onbtained from the above).
Private collection Berlin (acquired in 1975).

EXHIBITION: Karl Hagemeister, Bröhan-Museum, Berlin, March 12 - July 12, 1998, cat. no. 49.

LITERATURE: Peter Paret, Die Berliner Secession. Moderne Kunst und ihre Feinde im Kaiserlichen Deutschland, Berlin 1981, p. 105.
Irmgard Wirth, Berliner Malerei im 19. Jahrhundert, Berlin 1990, plate 75.
Margit Bröhan (ed.), Karl Hagemeister (1848 - 1933) - Gemälde-Pastelle-Zeichnungen, ex. cat. Bröhan Museum, Berlin 1998, p. 100 (illu. p. 101).

In the second half of the 1880s, Hagemeister’s encounters with European Modernism and the emerging Impressionism in Paris prompted him to experiment with Impressionist concepts of perception and representation. Inspired by the bright and powerful colors of the French artists and their sweeping, expressive brushstrokes, he began to search for his own artistic language. While living in Ferch, a small fishing village in Havelland, from 1880 to 1891/92, Hagemeister explored the rich local flora and fauna and, inspired by the French masters, the art of figure drawing. During his childhood in the countryside, Hagemeister developed an intimate love for the world of animals and plants. This devotion was rooted in his direct exposure to the natural world. “If you paint landscapes, you have to be where the landscape is; if you paint princesses, you have to be where the princesses are.” Hagemeister saw nature as a “spiritual element” which he sought to sense and feel by immersing himself in the natural world and working through the painting process. He developed a style of painting that contrasts a rough impasto foreground with a glazed background. Framed by these, the middle ground of his compositions usually present peasant women either in a resting position or going about their work. Presenting a snapshot of the reality experienced by simple country people, his works avoid the classic motifs of bourgeois portraits or historical scenes. Hagemeister’s rejection of any embellishment approaches a realism that foreshadows subsequent developments in Germany’s art salons. Far from urban censorship, Hagemeister is thus part of a slowly unfolding process towards fundamental future changes in the history of art. Our portrait, “The Girl in the Cabbage Field”, reveals a harmonious interaction between the native beauty found in mankind and nature. Sitting in the field, a plain-looking peasant girl is surrounded by natural scenery imbued with a more dynamic atmosphere. With serene grace, the girl gazes into the distance beyond the outer edge of the picture. A brief moment of stillness unfolds while the trees, shrubs and field move in the wind. Strong impasto applications of light yellow and green shades create a natural spectacle that swirls around the delicate girl in her simple dress. [CS]



345
Karl Hagemeister
Mädchen im Kohlfeld, 1886.
Oil on canvas
Estimate:
€ 20,000 / $ 18,400
Sold:
€ 46,875 / $ 43,125

(incl. surcharge)